Matching Entries: 5,119

    SDG 15
  • SDG-15
    Cladobotryum spp. Nees emend. (syn. Dactylium Nees)
    28 Apr 2020
    University of Sydney
    Perrine-Walker, Francine Thai, Meghann

    Historically, the soil habiting fungus Cladobotryum dendroides (Teleopmorh- Hypomyces rosellus) is the main causal agent of cobweb disease of the cultivated mushroom Agaricus bisporus. However, there are several Cladobotryum species that cause cobweb disease in commercially cultivated white button mushroom and other economically and wild edible mushrooms .The Cladobotryum protrusum genome is the …

  • SDG-15
    From reference genomes to population genomics: comparing three reference aligned reduced-representation sequencing pipelines in two wildlife species
    18 Aug 2020
    University of Sydney
    Wright, Belinda Farquharson, Katherine A. McLennan, Elspeth A. Belov, Katherine Hogg, Carolyn J. Grueber, Catherine E.

    Background: Recent advances in genomics have greatly increased research opportunities for non-model species. For wildlife, a growing availability of reference genomes means that population genetics is no longer restricted to a small set of anonymous loci. When used in conjunction with a reference genome, reduced-representation sequencing (RRS) provides a cost-effective method for obtaining reliab…

  • SDG-15
    Genetic analysis of scat samples to inform conservation of the Tasmanian devil
    18 Aug 2020
    University of Sydney
    Grueber, Catherine E. Chong, Rowena Gooley, Rebecca M. McLennan, Elspeth A. Barrs, Vanessa R. Belov, Katherine Hogg, Carolyn J.

    Recent advances in molecular genetics have enabled a great deal of information about species to be obtained from analysis of non-invasively collected samples such as scat. Scat provides genetic information via residual host DNA on the outside of the scat, via characterising the genetic makeup of intestinal microbes that are present in the scat, or by examining the DNA remnants of prey items that …

  • SDG-15
    Marsupial Gut Microbiome
    19 Aug 2020
    University of Sydney
    Chong, Rowena Cheng, Yuanyuan Hogg, Carolyn J. Belov, Katherine

    The study of the gut microbiome in threatened wildlife species has enormous potential to improve conservation efforts and gain insights into host-microbe coevolution. Threatened species are often housed in captivity, and during this process undergo considerable changes to their gut microbiome. Studying the gut microbiome of captive animals therefore allows identification of dysbiosis and opportun…

  • SDG-15
    Metapopulation management of an Endangered species with limited genetic diversity in the presence of disease: the Tasmanian devil Sarcophilus harrisii
    19 Aug 2020
    University of Sydney
    Hogg, Carolyn

    There has been much discussion relating to the current biodiversity crisis, with the loss of species now at an unprecedented rate. Using augmentation and/or reintroduction to minimize the loss of species in the wild is becoming more prominent. Zoological institutions have been traditionally involved in the management of insurance populations providing a range of species for release to the wild. I…

  • SDG-15
    The methylated component of the Neurospora crassa genome
    09 Feb 2005
    University of Edinburgh
    Selker, Eric U Tountas, Nikolaos A Cross, Sally H Margolin, Brian S Murphy, Jonathan G Bird, Adrian P Freitag, Michael

    Cytosine methylation is common, but not ubiquitous, in eukaryotes. Mammals (1) and the fungus Neurospora crassa (2,3) have about 2–3% of cytosines methylated. In mammals, methylation is almost exclusively in the under-represented CpG dinucleotides, and most CpGs are methylated (1) whereas in Neurospora, methylation is not preferentially in CpG dinucleotides and the bulk of the genome is unmethyla…

  • SDG-15
    Proximity signal and shade avoidance differences between early and late successional trees
    23 Feb 2005
    University of Edinburgh
    Gilbert, Ian R Jarvis, Paul G Smith, Harry

    Competitive interactions between plants determine the success of individuals and species. In developing forests, competition for light is the predominant factor. Shade tolerators acclimate photosynthetically to low light1±3 and are capable of long-term survival under the shade cast by others, whereas shade avoiders rapidly dominate gaps but are overtaken in due course by shade-tolerant, later suc…

  • SDG-15
    Trichloroacetic acid cycling in Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis) saplings and the effects on tree health following long term exposure.
    05 Oct 2005
    University of Edinburgh
    Dickey, Catherine A Heal, Kate V Stidson, R T Koren, R Cape, Neil Schröder, V Heal, Mathew R

    Trichloroacetic acid (TCA, CCl3COOH) has been associated with forest damage but the source of TCA to trees is poorly characterised. To investigate the routes and effects of TCA uptake in conifers, 120 Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis (Bong.) Carr) saplings were exposed to control, 10 or 100 μg l−1 solutions of TCA applied twice weekly to foliage only or soil only over two consecutive 5-month growin…

  • SDG-11 SDG-15
    Behaviour of the babirusa (Babyrousa babyrussa) with suggestions for husbandry.
    11 May 2006
    University of Edinburgh
    Leus, Kristin Bowles, D Bell, J Macdonald, Alastair A

    The babirusa is a remarkable pig, endemic on the Indonesian islands of Sulawesi, Buru and the smaller Sula and Togian islands. The single species of the genus is divisable into three living subspecies: Babyrousa babyrussa babyrussa (Sula Islands and Buru), B.b. togeanensis (Togian islands) and B.b. celebenesis (Sulawesi) (Groves, 1980), of which only the latter is currently represented in captivi…

  • SDG-13 SDG-15
    Experiments and Observation of Peat Smouldering Fires
    14 Feb 2007
    University of Edinburgh
    Ashton, Clare Rein, Guillermo Dios, JD Torero, Jose L Legg, C Davies, M Gray, A

    If a subsurface layer of peat is ignited, it smoulders (flameless combustion) slowly but steadily. These fires propagate for long periods of time (days, weeks, even years), are particularly difficult to extinguish and can spread over very extensive areas. Smouldering fires have an impact on the soil since the fuel burning is the combustible portion of the soil itself. An example of a peat fire is…