Psychosocial well-being of people living with HIV and the community before and after a HIV stigma-reduction community "hub" network intervention

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Peer-Reviewed Research
  • SDG 3
  • Abstract:

    The purpose of the research was to determine whether an HIV stigma-reduction community “hub” network intervention in a South African urban area would bring about a difference in the psychosocial well-being of people living with HIV (PLWH), as well as their community (living in the same municipal ward). A single case pre-test post-test design was implemented. The sample for this study included 62 PLWH who were selected through accessibility sampling and 570 community members who were selected through random voluntary sampling. Participants completed the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) and the Mental Health Continuum-Short Form (MHC-SF) before and after the intervention. A dependent t-test as well as Cohen’s d-values were used to calculate the differences between the pre- and post-test results for depression and well-being. Levels of languishing, moderate mental health and flourishing before and after the intervention were determined. Although the focus of the HIV stigma-reduction community “hub” intervention that was followed in this study was on the involvement of PLWH and people living close to them (PLC) to share their knowledge as community mobilisers and to mobilise and empower their own community to reduce HIV stigma, it can be concluded that a secondary gain was the effect it had on both depression and mental health of the PLWH as well as the community. Of interest is how these effects differed for PLWH and the community. It is thus recommended that future interventions should give special attention to aspects of depression and well-being