Systolic function evaluated with cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging in HIV-infected patients

Access full-text article here

Tags:

Peer-Reviewed Research
  • SDG 3
  • Abstract:

    BACKGROUND : Of all areas worldwide, sub-Saharan Africa is worst affected by the HIV and/or AIDS epidemic. Cardiovascular manifestations are very common and are a powerful contributor to mortality, but often go undetected. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) is the most reliable method of assessing cardiac function and morphology and, with this in mind, we initiated a cross-sectional study comparing CMR-determined morphological and functional parameters in asymptomatic HIV-infected patients who were not yet on treatment and early in the disease, with HIV-uninfected control patients. OBJECTIVES : To ascertain whether there were any morphological abnormalities or systolic functional impairments on CMR in untreated asymptomatic HIV-infected patients, compared with HIV-uninfected control individuals. METHODS : The CMR studies were performed using a 1.5-T whole-body clinical magnetic resonance 16-channel scanner (Achieva, Philips Medical Systems, Best, The Netherlands), using a cardiac five-element phased-array receiver coil (SENSE coil). Functional assessment was performed on 36 HIV-infected patients and the findings compared with 35 HIV-uninfected control patients who were matched for age and sex. RESULTS : There was no significant difference in systolic function between the HIV-uninfected and the HIV-infected patients. The left ventricular end diastolic mass (LVEDM) was slightly higher in the HIV-infected group, but this was statistically insignificant. CONCLUSION : No significant differences were found regarding the CMR systolic functional analysis and morphological parameters between the HIV-infected and the healthy volunteers.