Compromised bioavailable IGF-1 of black men relates favourably to ambulatory blood pressure: the SABPA study

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Peer-Reviewed Research
  • SDG 13
  • SDG 3
  • Abstract:

    Objectives Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) has potent endothelial-protective, anti-platelet and anti-thrombotic activities, and also exerts mitogenic and proliferatory actions on vascular smooth muscle cells. Conflicting reports exist regarding the role of IGF-1 in vascular protection and atherogenesis. We therefore investigated the relationships of ambulatory blood pressure (BP) and carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) with a range of components of the IGF-1 axis in a bi-ethnic population. Methods We included black (N = 86) and white (N = 101) men and measured growth hormone, total IGF-1, insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3), and pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A) levels. Results Ambulatory BP was almost 10 mmHg higher in black men (137/88 mmHg versus 128/80 mmHg; both p < 0.001), accompanied by an adverse profile of the IGF-axis for all measured components (all p < 0.01), including reduced bioavailable IGF-1 (IGF-1/IGFBP-3; p = 0.006) and tissue IGF-1 accessibility index as represented by IGF-1.PAPP-A/IGFBP-3 (p < 0.001). Single, partial and multiple regression analyses confirmed an independent inverse association between ambulatory systolic BP and bioavailable IGF-1 in black men (R2 = 0.24; β = −0.22; p = 0.035). cIMT was similar in the ethnic groups (p = 0.34), and was negatively associated with bioavailable IGF-1 in white men (R2 = 0.42; β = −0.17; p = 0.039) prior to adjustment for γ-glutamyl transferase (R2 = 0.45; β = −0.10; p = 0.25). Conclusion Ambulatory systolic BP is inversely related to bioavailable IGF-1 in black men who displayed low IGF-1 concentrations. An inverse relation was found between cIMT and IGF-1 in white men, which disappeared after correction for γ-glutamyl transferase – opposing reports of a detrimental role of IGF-1 in the early stages of atherogenesis.