The chemical, microbial, sensory and technological effects of intermediate salt levels as a sodium reduction strategy in fresh pork sausages

04 Feb 2017

The reduction of sodium in processed meat products is synonymous with the use of salt replacers. Rarely has there been an assessment of the use of intermediate salt levels as a sodium reduction strategy in itself. In this study, 1 and 1.5% salt levels were compared with 0 and 2% controls in fresh pork sausages for effects on chemical, microbial, sensory and technological stability. RESULTS: Although significant (P < 0.001 to P < 0.01) differences were found between the 0 and 2% controls, no significant differences could be detected between the 2, 1.5 and 1% added NaCl treatments for the following: total bacteria counts on days 3, 6 and 9; TBARS of pork sausages stored at 4 ?C on days 6 and 9 and stored at ?18 ?C on days 90 and 180; taste, texture and overall liking during sensory evaluation; and % cooking loss, % total loss and % refrigeration loss. Consumers were able to differentiate between the 2 and 1% added NaCl treatments in terms of saltiness. CONCLUSION: This study indicated that salt reduction to intermediate levels can be considered a sodium reduction strategy in itself but that further research with regards to product safety is needed.