Review Paper on Road Vehicle Vibration Simulation for Packaging Testing Purposes

19 Sep 2017

Inefficient packaging constitutes a global problem that costs hundreds of billions of dollars, not to mention the additional environmental impacts. An insufficient level of packaging increases the occurrence of product damage, while an excessive level increases the packages' weight and volume, thereby increasing distribution cost. This problem is well known, and for many years, engineers have tried to optimize packaging to protect products from transport hazards for minimum cost. Road vehicle shocks and vibrations, which is one of the primary causes of damage, need to be accurately simulated to achieve optimized product protection. Over the past 50 years, road vehicle vibration physical simulation has progressed significantly from simple mechanical machines to sophisticated computer-driven shaking tables. There now exists a broad variety of different methods used for transport simulation. Each of them addresses different particularities of the road vehicle vibration. Because of the nature of the road and vehicles, different sources and processes are present in the vibration affecting freight. Those processes can be simplified as the vibration generated by the general road surface unevenness, road surface aberrations (cracks, bumps, potholes, etc.) and the vehicle drivetrain system (wheels, drivetrain, engine, etc.). A review of the transport vibration simulation methods is required to identify and critically evaluate the recent developments. This review begins with an overview of the standardized methods followed by the more advanced developments that focus on the different random processes of vehicle vibration by simulating non-Gaussian, non-stationary, transient and harmonic signals. As no ideal method exists yet, the review presented in this paper is a guide for further research and development on the topic.