Bridging technology and clinical practice: innovating inpatient hyperglycaemia management in non-critical care settings.

07 Mar 2018

Emerging evidence shows that suboptimal glycaemic control is associated with increased morbidity and length of stay in hospital. Various guidelines for safe and effective inpatient glycaemic control in the non-critical care setting have been published. In spite of this, implementation in practice remains limited because of the increasing number of people with diabetes admitted to hospital and staff work burden. The use of technology in the outpatient setting has led to improved glycaemic outcomes and quality of life for people with diabetes. There remains an unmet need for technology utilisation in inpatient hyperglycaemia management in the non-critical care setting. Novel technologies have the potential to provide benefits in diabetes care in hospital by improving efficacy, safety and efficiency. Rapid analysis of glucose measurements by point-of-care devices help facilitate clinical decision-making and therapy adjustment in the hospital setting. Glucose treatment data integration with computerized glucose management systems underpins the effective use of decision support systems and may streamline clinical staff workflow. Continuous glucose monitoring and automation of insulin delivery through closed-loop systems may provide a safe and efficacious tool for hospital staff to manage inpatient hyperglycaemia whilst reducing staff workload. This review summarizes the evidence with regard to technological methods to manage inpatient glycaemic control, their limitations and the future outlook, as well as potential strategies by healthcare organizations such as the National Health Service to mediate the adoption, procurement and use of diabetes technologies in the hospital setting.